Sunday Workshops

GO TO SATURDAY WORKSHOPS

SUNDAY:  Session I  •  Roundtables  •  Session II  •  Session III 
 

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SCHEDULE: Sunday, February 17, 2019 

8:30 am

Registration & Exhibitors' Fair open; refreshments available

8:30-10:00 am

Wellness Fair & Breakfast Treats 

10:00–11:15 am

Workshop Session I

11:30-12:30 pm

Keynote: Melody Walker Brook

12:30–2:30 pm

Lunch, Exhibitors' Fair, & Roundtables (1:30–2:30)

2:45–4:00 pm 

Workshop Session II

4:15–5:30 pm

Workshop Session III

5:30 pm

Ice Cream Social

 


Sunday - Session I: 10:00-11:15 pm

Agricultural Dowsing as a Management Tool for the Farm 

Presenter: Steve Herbert, Earth Water Alliance, Living Waters Professional Dowsing Services

In this workshop, Steve will explain how dowsing goes far beyond just locating water, and can be a useful and inexpensive management tool in all decisions one needs to make in farming and gardening. With the aid of a simple pendulum and a suite of charts, one can discern nutrient levels, choose best natural fertilizers and amendments, determine amounts and frequency of application, select optimum timings of sowing, transplanting and harvesting, identify most useful cultural practices, and much more. Learn how to increase both nutrient density and yields with this simple method.

(Biological) Agents of Change: Managing Natural Enemies for Sustainable Pest Control 

Presenter: Vic Izzo & Scott Lewins, UVM

During this workshop Scott and Vic will discuss the basic biology, ecology and behavior of organisms commonly used in biological control and detail their use in sustainable pest management. The workshop will focus on strategies for making informed decisions allowing you to get the most out of your biological control program.

Get on the Farm to School Bus! A Training for Advocates to Strengthen Farm to School Across Vermont

Presenters: Betsy Rosenbluth, Jorge Yagual & Dana Hudson, VT-FEED - Shelburne Farms

Most Vermont schools are purchasing some local food for cafeterias and building school gardens, but to create more sustainable programs we need to fully integrate farm to school at the district level. How do we engage Superintendents, Curriculum Coordinators, and School Boards? This training will equip the Farm to School advocate with the tools to educate their school leaders and give them access to the new School Leaders Campaign Toolkit. We will also review the results of a recent school survey to better understand the current state of farm to school in Vermont.

Invasive Species Management: Application of the Science, Rehabilitation of the Land & Successful Transition 

Presenters: Mike Bald, Got Weeds?; Cat Buxton, Vermont Healthy Soils Coalition 

Invasive plant species present new challenges with every growing season, and growers are directly impacted by events on adjacent spaces, roadsides, riverbanks, rights-of-ways, and transition zones such as woodlines. Cooperation is critical among local farmers, growers, road crews, recreationists, landowners, and conservation commissions for the management of of non-native species such as Japanese knotweed and wild parsnip.It is also important to understand the nuances of control work: what to do, when to do it, where to focus, what to focus on, and what not to do. This presentation highlights three invasive plant species that impact much of Vermont's landscape and site-specific examples of management methods. The workshop concludes with audience participation with aerial views and online mapping used to assess sites, set priorities, and walk through treatment options.

Living Without Fossil Fuels

Presenter: Ross Conrad, Dancing Bee Gardens

Discover the ins and outs and the ups and downs of trying to live without burning fossil fuels while still being an active member of the community. Ross shares the joy and satisfaction he and his partner, Alice, experience living a life that is more in line with their moral values and ideals than the standard American dream.

Making Money in Agriculture: Lessons from the Wine Business

Presenter: Charlie Merinoff, Breakthru Beverage Company

Charlie Merinoff, Co-Chairman of the Breakthru Beverage Group in New York City, has been working with farmers in Vermont on building terroir with small-scale producers to increase their price in the marketplace. How can farmers tell the story of their production that will connect with their customers? How has terroir helped farmers in the wine industry and how can farmers in Vermont benefit? Join Charlie as he shares his years of experience marketing wine.

Opportunities for Strengthening Organic Dairy in the Northeast: From Kelp to Grass-Fed to Human Health

Presenter: Andre Brito, University of New Hampshire

Consumption of organic fluid milk and sales are declining, threatening the social and economic sustainability of organic dairy farms in the Northeast and beyond. There has also been an increased demand for non-dairy alternative drinks including almond, soy, hazelnut, and other sources. This workshop will cover the nutritional value of milk from bioactive fatty acids (e.g., omega-3, CLA) to trace minerals (e.g., iodine) relative to human health in comparison to non-dairy drinks, so that farmers and allied industry can capitalize on new marketing opportunities. The increased demand for grass-fed organic milk and the use of kelp meal as a source of iodine will be extensively discussed. Farmers, extension educators, students and the general public are welcome to attend.

Pasturing Goats for the Commercial Scale

Presenter: Annie Basehore Starbard, Farmer, Author & Consultant

Learn how to set up a foraging and pasturing system to benefit your commercial goat enterprise. This workshop will detail positives and negatives to this system for your dairy, meat and fiber business. Practicals such as fencing, health concerns, nutrition and plantings will be discussed as well as ideas for marketing your forage based products. Goat anatomy makes these small ruminants perfect foragers. Learn how to rebuild your goat business for greater profit using a holistic approach to pasturing and foraging your herd.

Political Pathways to Pesticide-Free Communities: A Suite of Stories & Approaches for Activists

Presenter: Philip Ackerman-Leist, Sterling College

The town of Mals in the Italian Alps became the first town in the world to ban all pesticides. Growing from a group of accidental activists into savvy advocates for a ground-breaking public referendum, the citizens of Mals used the precautionary principle, direct democracy, and collective action to become an international model for pesticide-free communities. Hear this fascinating story, get inspired and find out what strategies other communities around the US and abroad are using to pursue a pesticide-free future.

Rethinking Land Ownership in Honoring Vermont’s Original Inhabitants, Part 1.

Presenters: Charlie D.-Megeso, John Hunt, and Carol McGranaghan, members of the Nulhegan-Coosuk Abenaki Tribe; Kerry Wood, member of the St. Francis/Sokoki  AbenakiStephanie Morningstar, member of the Oneida Turtle clan; Beverly Little Thunder, Lakota Standing Rock Band; Catherine Cadden, Eastern Band Cherokee, Wolf ClanCarol Irons, founder of the Abenaki Cultural Regeneration Project (ACRP); Erok Gillard, Jess Rubin, Amanda Franz & Abbi Jaffe, Dawnland Decolonization

Do you ever wonder about the precolonial history of the land you tend? Are you curious to know more about the original stewards of this land, the Abenaki, and other Indigenous peoples of northeast Turtle Island? Are you open to exploring how tending land in Vermont might look different when we take an honest look at the history of colonization?

Join Abenaki citizens, other Indigenous earthworkers, and members of Dawnland Decolonization study group (a group of white allies) to learn about Vermont’s land history and how patterns of colonization can be transformed to promote healing and reciprocity. This workshop will explore our individual relationships and our knowledge of the land we tend, and investigate new ways to orient that can help in beginning the process of repatriation. No previous knowledge is required. Reading and further research resources will be provided. 

Part 1 of this workshop will focus on listening to panelists' perspectives with a brief time for questions.

Shade Gardening with Medicinal Plants 

Presenter: Guido Mase, Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Urban Moonshine

Learn about some beautiful and medicinal Northeast natives that can be grown in both deep and partial shade. These plants make attractive additions even in small spaces, and there are many plants to choose from. We will cover some important crops like ginseng and goldenseal, but also some medicinal ornamentals like black cohosh, blue cohosh, mayapple and wild yam. Finally, we will explore a potential shade garden design to see how a woodland garden could be organized.

Stories from the Farm, Garden, and Kitchen

Presenters: Helen Labun, Vermont’s Local Banquet; Jennifer and John Churchman, Author & Illustrator; Julia Shipley, Poet; Kate Spring, Farmer & Writer

Vermont is full of farmers, gardeners, and cooks, who are not only talented food producers but also talented storytellers. This panel discussion will present experiences from producers who have taken their love of stories one step further to become published authors. The panelists will talk about how they got started in writing, how they have balanced writing with their other work, and the impact they see of telling stories about our local food system. This workshop is great for writers, aspiring writers, and enthusiastic readers.

Theory and Practice of Nourishing Plants Organically

Presenter: Lee Reich, Springtown Farmden

In organic growing, nitrogen is usually the nutrient element most limiting plant growth, so let’s explore the natural forms and transformations of nitrogen in the soil. Tapping into this natural, elegant system when nourishing your plants is efficient, environmentally sound, and beneficial for plant health. Discussion will include ideas for making the best of this system whether on a garden or farm scale.

Veggie Wash-Pack Getting You Down? Dial in Best Practices to Improve your Post-Harvest Efficiency, Profitability and Food Safety, Part 1.

Presenters: Hans Estrin & Andrew Chamberlin, UVM Extension

If you are a commercial produce grower wanting to improve your farm’s post-harvest efficiency, product quality, profitability, and food safety, this workshop is for you. In this double session we will dive into the best flow, infrastructure, equipment and tools of the post-harvest world. Case studies, stories and photos will bring to life best-practices and LEAN planning principles behind successful farms. Come with a post-harvest problem or improvement project in mind. Planning templates, prompts, as well as expert and peer support will allow you to leave this workshop with a plan, and with the knowledge and resources needed to follow through.

 

Sunday - ROUNDTABLES: 1:30-2:30 PM

Unpacking the 2018 Farm Bill: What it Means for Food & Farming in Vermont

Maddie Kempner, NOFA-VT; Ariana Taylor-Stanley, National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC)

In December 2018, Congress passed another five year Farm Bill, which will have broad reaching impacts on how farmland is managed, how nutrition programs are delivered to those in need, and innumerable other aspects of our food and agriculture systems across the country. The 2018 Farm Bill contains many exciting wins for organic farmers, beginning and socially disadvantaged producers, local and regional food systems, and key nutrition programs. While many of the worst possible outcomes were avoided, the Farm Bill has largely been viewed as maintaining the status quo and continuing to tip the scales in favor of industrial agriculture overall. Join us for a roundtable discussion with Northeast food and farm policy experts to learn what’s in the latest Farm Bill and how it will impact farmers and eaters in Vermont and beyond.

Vermont Cover Crops: Perspectives from UVM Extension and Growers 

Becky Maden, UVM Extension; Aly Martelle, Intervale Community Farm

There's more to cover cropping on a vegetable farm than fall planted winter rye! Join this roundtable discussion to  share and learn about cover crop innovations, from beautiful summer mixes, to living walkways, to home-grown mulch or grain, to pollinator habitat. Come prepared to share and learn about managing cover crops on all scales, timing of seeding and incorporating for optimal benefit, and maximizing the benefits from cover crops on your farm.

Vermont Organic Farmers (VOF) Meet & Greet: Understanding Organic Certification

Nicole Dehne, VOF Certification Director; Brian Shevrin VOF Certification Specialist (Vegetables & Fruit); Kyla Bedard, VOF Certification Specialist (Livestock & Dairy)

Thinking about becoming a certified organic operation? Already certified but have questions about standards? Want to learn more about the certification process, the perks and the paperwork? Join in on this roundtable to talk face-to-face with certification specialists and get your questions answered!

 

SUNDAY - Session II: 2:45-4:00 pm

The Birth of the Real Organic Project

Presenter: Dave Chapman, Real Organic Project, Long Wind Farm

A journey through the loss of the National Organic Program, and what American farmers are doing to reclaim it. Learn from Dave about the efforts of the Real Organic Project to ensure the principles of organic farming retain their significance for supporting healthy people and for building healthy communities. In this workshop we will discuss how the Real Organic Project connects to international efforts to protect the meaning of organic.

Dancing the Abenaki Year: The Agricultural Calendar of Indigenous Vermont

Presenter: Alnôbaiwi Dance Group

Join the Alnôbaiwi Dance Group for a demonstration of the sacred dances of the Abenaki agricultural calendar including the seasonal Harvest Dances of Sun, Rain, Hunting and Green Corn ceremonies. Traditional dress will accompany music and song.

Efficient and Resilient Systems on the Small Farm

Presenter: Daniel Mays, Frith Farm

Do you want to talk about how to set up systems that make a small diversified farm run smoothly? Learn how to design an efficient farm layout, simplify and build resiliency into daily operations, streamline planning and record-keeping, and communicate effectively with employees. Daniel will talk about the tools he uses and the systems he has developed at Frith Farm to keep productivity high, employees happy, and schedules sane. Leave this workshop with the tools to design and implement resilient systems on your own farm. 

Forage Resiliency in an Unpredictable and Extreme Changing Climate

Presenters: Lindsey Ruhl & Joshua Faulkner, UVM Extension

Producing forage in Vermont’s climate is becoming difficult as growing conditions become more unpredictable and extreme. Forage quality and quantity is impacted by forage type and the environmental conditions they are grown in. Lindsey and Joshua will share research conducted by UVM Extension comparing annual and perennial systems with different levels of diversity. Results from a study investigating soil health and compaction in perennial forage systems will be used to frame climate change challenges and possible adaptation strategies for farms.

Growing and Dyeing: Our Favorite Plants for a Dye Garden

Presenters: Carolina Lukac & Ehrin Lingeman, Vermont Community Garden Network

Experience the colors of the rainbow in this hands-on introduction to the world of plant-based natural dyes. From golden yellow to robin’s egg blue, we will share our adventures in growing and processing a handful of dye plants in our community garden plots. Our focus will be on beginner-friendly dye plants and techniques for you to learn the basics on mordants, after baths, and over dyeing on silk and wool.

Hop Production in Vermont

Presenters: Julian Post, Champlain Valley Hops; Heather Darby, UVM Extension

According to the Brewer's Association, craft beer production in the U.S. has more than tripled since 2007, and Vermont is home to more brewers (and barrels of beer) per capita than any other state. Vermont brewers currently use enough hops to support more than 300 acres of hop production, yet our state only has about 45 acres currently in production. It's time to grow some more hops! In this workshop we will walk through a typical hop-growing season, including harvest and processing. We will discuss the differences between organic and conventional production methods, and go over best practices for growing hops organically. Bring your questions and learn from Julian's experience setting up a hop yard in Vermont.

The Impact of Policy on Vermont's Food Traditions

Presenters: Ben Hewitt & Graham Unangst-Rufenacht, Rural Vermont

This workshop will explore how policy and the resulting regulations impact the food traditions of our state, as well as broader, intersectional implications relating to climate, economic viability, and the health of Vermonters and the land. The focus will be a clear and concise explanation of the policy landscape, as well as an honest assessment of related outcomes.

The Language Plants Use: Molecular Signals and Behavior Response

Presenter: Guido Mase, Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Urban Moonshine

Plants speak to each other using a range of chemical compounds, some secreted via the rhizosphere, some volatilized into the air. Using these signals, plants can recognize kinship, alter their behavior, and even communicate with other kingdoms of life: fungi and animals. In this workshop we will review the current understanding around this fascinating topic, and discuss the implications for us humans, too.

Pruning Fruit Trees, Shrubs and Vines

Presenter: Lee Reich, Springtown Farmden

Correct and timely pruning is the key to keeping apples, peaches, grapes, blueberries, and other fruiting plants healthy, productive and bearing the tastiest fruits. Learn the how and -- importantly -- the why of pruning these plants in their young, developing stage and then as they mature and bear fruits. We will also go over how to bring a neglected, old plant back to its former, luscious glory.

Rethinking Land Ownership in Honoring Vermont’s Original Inhabitants, Part 1. - RESCHEDULED TO SUNDAY SESSION 1 - 10-11:15am

Presenters: Charlie D.-Megeso, John Hunt, and Carol McGranaghan, members of the Nulhegan-Coosuk Abenaki Tribe; Kerry Wood, member of the St. Francis/Sokoki  AbenakiStephanie Morningstar, member of the Oneida Turtle clan; Beverly Little Thunder, Lakota Standing Rock Band; Catherine Cadden, Eastern Band Cherokee, Wolf ClanCarol Irons, founder of the Abenaki Cultural Regeneration Project (ACRP); Erok Gillard, Jess Rubin, Amanda Franz & Abbi Jaffe, Dawnland Decolonization

Do you ever wonder about the precolonial history of the land you tend? Are you curious to know more about the original stewards of this land, the Abenaki, and other Indigenous peoples of northeast Turtle Island? Are you open to exploring how tending land in Vermont might look different when we take an honest look at the history of colonization?

Join Abenaki citizens, other Indigenous earthworkers, and members of Dawnland Decolonization study group (a group of white allies) to learn about Vermont’s land history and how patterns of colonization can be transformed to promote healing and reciprocity. This workshop will explore our individual relationships and our knowledge of the land we tend, and investigate new ways to orient that can help in beginning the process of repatriation. No previous knowledge is required. Reading and further research resources will be provided. 

Part 1 of this workshop will focus on listening to panelists' perspectives with a brief time for questions.

Storytelling Through Social Media

Presenters: Melissa Pasanen, Food Writer; Kate Spring, Good Heart Farmstead; Taylor Hutchison, Footprint Farm; Calley Hastings, Fat Toad Farm

Telling your story through social media is a great way to interact with your customers and build your brand, but it doesn't come easily to everyone. This panel will showcase three different farmers that have built successful social media accounts. You'll hear from them about some of their most successful posts of the past year and tips for how to use storytelling to engage and grow your followers.

Treatment-Free Beekeeping

Presenter: Ross Conrad, Dancing Bee Gardens

Unlike what many seem to think, treatment-free beekeeping is not ignoring your hives and crossing your fingers. Ross will review techniques for controlling diseases and pests without the need to introduce any foreign substances to the hive. He will also share the preliminary results of a SARE grant project that is designed to test the efficacy of treatment-free management for varroa mites.

Veggie Wash-Pack Getting You Down? Dial in Best Practices to Improve your Post-Harvest Efficiency, Profitability and Food Safety, Part 2.

Presenters: Hans Estrin & Andrew Chamberlin, UVM Extension

If you are a commercial produce grower wanting to improve your farm’s post-harvest efficiency, product quality, profitability, and food safety, this workshop is for you. In this double session we will dive into the best flow, infrastructure, equipment and tools of the post-harvest world. Case studies, stories and photos will bring to life best-practices and LEAN planning principles behind successful farms. Come with a post-harvest problem or improvement project in mind. Planning templates, prompts, as well as expert and peer support will allow you to leave this workshop with a plan, and with the knowledge and resources needed to follow through.

Vermont's New Cash Crop?: Practical Information for Growing Hemp

Presenters: Keith Morris, Willow Crossing Farm; Brian Shevrin, Vermont Organic Farmers (VOF); Maddie Kempner, NOFA-VT

By the time you read this description, the rules and regulations for cultivating low-THC cannabis will have changed dramatically. With the passage of the 2018 farm bill, the production of hemp is federally legal. Learn about the practical side of hemp production, hear the nitty gritty of getting your hemp or CBD products certified organic, and get a policy update on the latest rules and regulations governing hemp production in Vermont.

SUnday - Session III: 4:15-5:30 pm

A Showcase of Smart Growth Farm Startups

Presenters: Eli Hersh, Shadow Creek Farm; Keith Drinkwine, Flatlander Farm

Hear the trials and tribulations of two beginning farm business. Join Eli and Keith to explore different business models for starting your own farm operation. Drawing on their vegetable and animal operations they will discuss using low risk approaches with limited resources while balancing working full time off farm. Presenters will welcome attendees to share their startup successes and resources. Break out groups will help to explore common startup problems and how to solve them. 

Adapting to Weather Extremes on Diversified Vegetable & Berry Farms

Presenters: Alissa White, UVM; Justin Rich, Burnt Rock Farm

Farmers are on the front lines of dealing with the impacts of changing climatic trends and extreme weather. This session will explore results from a regional survey conducted last year highlighting how vegetable and berry growers across the Northeast are adapting to the impacts of increasingly extreme weather. Join us to look at how site characteristics influence the strategies that farmers are using to manage for drought and heavy precipitation. The workshop will close with ample time for farmer-to-farmer style discussions about the most innovative and promising ideas from commercial growers across the region.

Effective Email Marketing & Copywriting for Farmers

Presenter: Kate Spring, Good Heart Farmstead

Copywriting & email marketing are two essential tools for every farmer. Copy has the power to attract customers, and email marketing makes more sales than any social media post.

In this workshop you will learn: What is copywriting & permission-based marketing; simple tweaks to make your writing more effective (ie: make more sales); how to identify your ideal customer and speak directly to them; what type of copy to use across different marketing channels; how to set up an email marketing account, and why you need one; how to sell through email.

Fermentation 101

Presenter: Nancy VanWinkle, Nomadic Roots Kitchen

Empower yourself to ferment your own food -- it is easy and inexpensive! In this hands-on workshop, you will learn about the time-honored tradition of using natural fermentation to preserve vegetables, as well as the benefits of consuming nutrient-dense, fermented foods. Participants will prepare seasonal vegetable ferments, from traditional sauerkraut to variations on the traditional stuff. Participants will go home with their own prepared jar of kraut and a wealth of knowledge about this fascinating form of food preservation.

Note: Due to the limit of materials available, this workshop will be capped at 35 people. First come, first serve.

Introduction to Phytonutrients

Presenter: Betzy Bancroft, Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism

You have heard of ‘eat a rainbow each day’—find out more about why! There are colorful substances in foods that are not considered vitamins, yet have beneficial effects on our body’s structures and their functions, acting in several ways to help protect us from disease. We will discuss these beneficial effects and give examples of the phytonutrients and the plants that provide them and grow locally. 

The Lifelong Pleasure of Local Foods: Local Menus for the Aging Palate

Presenters: Zea Luce, Vermont Fresh Network; Christine Moldovan, Age Well; Tim Pratt, Living Well Group; George Mackey, Westview Meadows and The Gary Residence​

Do you plan to continue to eat locally as you age? Our taste in food changes as we get older. Children's sensitive and sweet-loving taste buds evolve to more complex flavors as adults, and then again to different palates as seniors. Join in a panel discussion with Christine Moldovan RD, CD, FAND, Nutrition Director at Age Well, who will lend her nutrition expertise on food and wellness as we age and our changing taste buds. Hear from Tim Pratt, food and beverage director at Living Well Group, and George Mackey, executive chef at Westview Meadows and The Gary Residence, senior residential facilities that take all of this into account as they menu plan, whilst sourcing local products and seamlessly incorporating them in their dishes. 

Making Food Systems Change at the Local Level: Addressing Food Access through Municipal Planning

Presenter: Taylar Foster, Consultant

In this workshop we will share a resource to be launched in 2019, “Local Planning for Food Access: A Toolkit for Vermont’s Communities” which is intended to help community members, volunteers, planners, and local governments fight hunger and improve nutrition through town and regional planning and action. Attendees will learn about the planning process and how to use this new toolkit to leverage town and regional plans to address food access through land use decisions, transportation, economic development, and more.

Rethinking Land Ownership in Honoring Vermont’s Original Inhabitants, Part 2.

Presenters: Charlie D.-Megeso, John Hunt, and Carol McGranaghan, members of the Nulhegan-Coosuk Abenaki Tribe; Kerry Wood, member of the St. Francis/Sokoki  AbenakiStephanie Morningstar, member of the Oneida Turtle clan; Beverly Little Thunder, Lakota Standing Rock Band; Catherine Cadden, Eastern Band Cherokee, Wolf Clan; Carol Irons, founder of the Abenaki Cultural Regeneration Project (ACRP); Erok Gillard, Jess Rubin, Abbi Jaffe, Amanda Franz, Dawnland Decolonization 

Do you ever wonder about the precolonial history of the land you tend? Are you curious to know more about the original stewards of this land, the Abenaki, and other Indigenous peoples of northeast Turtle Island? Are you open to exploring how tending land in Vermont might look different when we take an honest look at the history of colonization?

Join Abenaki citizens, other Indigenous earthworkers, and members of Dawnland Decolonization study group (a group of white allies) to learn about Vermont’s land history and how patterns of colonization can be transformed to promote healing and reciprocity. This workshop will explore our individual relationships and our knowledge of the land we tend, and investigate new ways to orient that can help in beginning the process of repatriation. No previous knowledge is required. Reading and further research resources will be provided.

Part 2 of this workshop will start with listening to panelists' perspectives and then diving into group work.

Sharing the Load: Knowing What and When to Outsource

Presenters: Elena Gustavson & Becca Schrader, Vermont Community Loan Fund

Farmers and food business entrepreneurs are often used to doing everything themselves. While drive and energy are critical to success, spreading yourself too thin can result in business practice inefficiencies and a poor quality of life. This interactive discussion will give you tools to analyze where your time is going, and help figure out if you are really saving money by taking on everything. We will also share ideas about when and how to efficiently use outside services. Get back some of your time so you can do things like long-term planning and strategizing, or even just relaxing.

Transformative Agroecology: U.S. and International Perspectives

Presenters: Ernesto Mendez, UVM; Martha Caswell, Agroecology and Livelihoods Collaborative (ALC)

Agroecology is gaining popularity all across the world in its effort to use the study of ecological processes and apply them to agricultural production systems. In this workshop, panelists in different dimensions of agroecology- academia, social movements, extension.- will share their recent experience in agroecology as the field continues to grow and evolve. We will share examples of our work in Latin America and Vermont.

Understanding Invasive Plants: Ecology, History, Food, and Medicine

Presenter: Elliot Cluba, Herbs & Arrows

Hone in on the medicinal properties of a handful of the most invasive plants in the area. We will look at the relationships that these plants have as healers of our inner biology and the biology of our surrounding ecosystem, and how these plants are showing up just when they need to be in an era of such biological instability. We will also look at many other functions that such plants have and how they can begin to become a part of our day to day lives.

Where is Your Nitrogen Going? Soil Nitrogen Dynamics & an Online Nitrogen Management Tool

Presenters: Lindsey Ruhl, UVM Extension; Kyle Dittmer, Rubenstein School of Environmental and Natural Resources UVM

Agricultural management practices can impact nitrogen gas emissions which contribute to a loss of fertility and an addition of greenhouse gases. goCrop, a web based nutrient management tool, is being adapted to include a nitrogen management tool (NMT) that relatively compares the impact of rotation, management practices, weather, and soil type on SOM, PAN, N leaching, and N volatilization. To set the context for a hands-on demonstration of the NMT, results from in-field gaseous nitrogen measurements will be paired with crop and yield quality to provide outcomes of adopting BMPs. This workshop is intended for an intermediate level, commercial scale audience.